Hewitt, D.

Influence of Jasmonic acid on the response of pasture to ozone

The data are biomass and ozone-injury data for white clover (Trifolium repens). Dataset concerns a 2014 study on the effects of Jasmonic acid/cutting in modulating the response of clover to ozone. A short-term (4-week) ozone-exposure experiment was conducted in 2014 to investigate the interactive effects of cutting on ozone-induced responses in white clover (Trifolium repens). A strong interaction was found in root biomass and root nodule biomass in cut white clover plants in a high ozone background (45-67 parts per billion (ppb) treatment mean), suggesting ozone-impacts on root nodule biomass occur through limitation of carbon availability. The work was carried out as part of a NERC funded PhD. Project number NEC04456

Publication date: 2017-04-21

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Supporting documentation

Format of the dataset : Comma-separated values (CSV)

This dataset is made available under the terms of the Open Government Licence

You must cite: Hewitt, D. (2017). Influence of Jasmonic acid on the response of pasture to ozone. NERC Environmental Information Data Centre. https://doi.org/10.5285/10c6df00-c7ef-444b-951f-33a2c0072bec

 

© Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (Natural Environment Research Council)

Where/When

Study area
Temporal extent
2015-05-28    to    2015-06-24

Provenance & quality

A short-term (4-week) ozone-exposure experiment was conducted in 2014 to investigate the interactive effects of cutting on ozone-induced responses in white clover (Trifolium repens). Seedlings were propagated in early Spring 2014. After three weeks, to introduce a soil microbe, pots were inoculated with a soil slurry mixture. Pots were then divided between 3 treatments: uncut pots (controls), with a single cut to 4 centimetre (cm)m height immediately prior to ozone exposure and uncut, with a weekly application of Methyl-Jasmonate solution during the experiment. The seedlings were grown on for four weeks then exposed to random ozone profiles for four weeks. A representative quarter of each pot was selected and recordings of healthy, injured or senesced leaves made on in weeks 2, 3 and 4. The harvest of above and below-ground biomass was performed after 4 weeks on each pot. Shoot biomass, and root biomass from a representative quarter of the pot, were dried for a minimum of 48 hours at 60 degrees Celsius. Root nodule biomass was also excised from the root system, and was air dried, sized and weighed. Root biomass, nodule mass and nodule numbers per pot were calculated. Leaf area index (LAI) of undamaged leaves was determined from dried forage. Mean injury and senescence data across the recordings was determined for each pot, and was arcsine transformed prior to analysis. Injury and senescence data, and selected biomass data, were then analysed by analysis of variance (ANOVA), with ozone background and treatment applied as factors. Post-hoc Tukey's honest significant difference tests were used to determine the significance of factors where appropriate. Relationships between total root nodule biomass and biomass, and raw injury parameters for each treatment were also investigated via Pearson's correlation analysis. All analyses were conducted in R Software (version 3.1.2). Full details of the experimental process are given in detail with the metadata. Data was first recorded in the field in field notebooks, and was then transferred to electronic copies (MS Excel worksheets). Data was then exported as .csv files for ingestion into the Environmental Information Data Centre.



Correspondence/contact details

Mills, G.
Centre for Ecology & Hydrology
enquiries@ceh.ac.uk
Hewitt, D.
Centre for Ecology & Hydrology
enquiries@ceh.ac.uk

Authors

Hewitt, D.
Centre for Ecology & Hydrology

Other contacts

Custodian
Publisher
NERC Environmental Information Data Centre
eidc@ceh.ac.uk

Spatial

Spatial representation type
Tabular (text)

Tags

Topic categories
Environment
Keywords
Abergwyngregyn Clover,  Environmental risk Ozone,  Pollution Pollution & Environmental Risk Root biomass Solardomes,  Solar Domes
INSPIRE Theme
Environmental Monitoring Facilities