Brennan, G.; Creer, S.; Griffith, G.

Abundance of airborne pollen for nine grass species, measured by qPCR, UK, 2016-2017

The dataset contains abundance data of airborne pollen (including Anthoxanthum odoratum (sweet vernal-grass), Arrhenatherum elatius (false oat-grass), Cynosurus cristatus (crested dog’s-tail), Dactylis glomerata (cock’s-foot), Lolium perenne (perennial ryegrass), Phleum pratense (Timothy), Poa pratensis (smooth meadow-grass), grass species within the genera Alopecurus/Agrostis, and one probe that was found to be degenerate and unable to discriminate grass species. Here we used qPCR to track the seasonal progression of airborne grass pollen, in time and space. To do this we collected aerial samples from thirteen sites across the UK during the pollen seasons (May to September) of 2016 and 2017.

Publication date: 2020-12-15

Get the data

This dataset is available under the terms of the Open Government Licence

Format of the data: Comma-separated values (CSV)

You must cite: Brennan, G.; Creer, S.; Griffith, G. (2020). Abundance of airborne pollen for nine grass species, measured by qPCR, UK, 2016-2017. NERC Environmental Information Data Centre. https://doi.org/10.5285/28208be4-0163-45e6-912c-2db205126925

 

Where/When

Study area
Temporal extent
2016-05-01    to    2017-09-30

Provenance & quality

The qPCR data was collected using a QuantStudio 6 Flex Real‐Time qPCR machine (ThermoFisher Scientific). Species-specific primers were designed to target the ITS2 region of abundant grass species in the UK including Anthoxanthum odoratum (sweet vernal-grass), Arrhenatherum elatius (false oat-grass), Cynosurus cristatus (crested dog’s-tail), Dactylis glomerata (cock’s-foot), Lolium perenne (perennial ryegrass), Phleum pratense (Timothy), Poa pratensis (smooth meadow-grass), grass species within the genera Alopecurus/Agrostis, and one probe that was found to be degenerate and unable to discriminate grass species.

Of 1,400 daily aerial samples, 1,210 were selected for downstream molecular analysis. Samples were excluded if pollen could not be reliably extracted due to large volumes of rainwater in collection tubes.

Quantitative PCR runs with PCR efficiencies less than 85% and greater than 115% were not used for further analysis (efficiency of qPCR data used in downstream analysis ranged between 88.5% and 106%). Data points with a large standard deviation between three technical replicates (>6.95, based on the upper quartile range of the data) were removed. In addition, samples which amplified before 10 cycles and after 38 cycles were removed to reduce the chance of detecting false positive or false negative amplification respectively. The reliability of the data was evaluated based on the positive and negative controls.

Correspondence/contact details

Dr. Georgina Brennan
Bangor University
 g.l.brennan@bangor.ac.uk

Authors

Brennan, G.
Bangor University
Creer, S.
Bangor University
Griffith, G.
Aberystwyth University

Other contacts

Custodian
NERC EDS Environmental Information Data Centre
 info@eidc.ac.uk
Publisher
NERC Environmental Information Data Centre
 info@eidc.ac.uk
Rights Holder
Bangor University
 copyright@bangor.ac.uk

Additional metadata

Topic categories
Biota
Keywords
Airborne pollen,  Biodiversity environmental DNA,  grass pollen season,  quantitative PCR (qPCR),  UK
INSPIRE Theme
Environmental Monitoring Facilities
Spatial representation type
Tabular (text)
Spatial reference system
WGS 84 / Pseudo-Mercator
Last updated
25 June 2021 18:40