Rousham, E.K. et al

Antibiotic susceptibility tests and resistance genes in Escherichia coli from humans, poultry and environmental samples in urban and rural Bangladesh (2017)

Antibiotic susceptibility tests are presented as the zone of inhibition using the disc-diffusion method, and categorized as resistant, intermediate or susceptible. DNA samples from antibiotic-resistant bacteria were analysed for the presence or absence of resistance genes using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Laboratory analyses were conducted by trained staff at the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b).

The aim of the study was to identify the antibiotic-susceptibility profiles and resistance genes of bacteria (Escherichia coli) obtained from humans, poultry and the environment. Bacterial isolates previously identified with resistance to third-generation cephalosporins or carbapenems were included in the analysis. Bacterial samples originated from rural households and poultry farms (broiler chickens) in Mirzapur, Tangail district; and urban food markets in Dhaka city, Bangladesh. Environmental samples included surface water, water supply, wastewater, soil, animal faeces (poultry and cattle) and solid waste.

The survey was part of a wider research project, Spatial and Temporal Dynamics of Antimicrobial Resistance Transmission from the Outdoor Environment to Humans in Urban and Rural Bangladesh. The research was funded by NERC/BBSRC/MRC on behalf of the Antimicrobial Resistance Cross-Council Initiative award NE/N019555/1.

Publication date: 2019-02-11

Get the data

This dataset will be available under the terms of the Open Government Licence

Format of the dataset : Comma-separated values (CSV)

You must cite: Rousham, E.K.; Islam, M.A.; Unicomb, L.; Asaduzzaman, M.; Islam, R.; Amin, B.; Mozmader, T.I.M.A.; Hossain, M.I.; Rahman, M. (2019). Antibiotic susceptibility tests and resistance genes in Escherichia coli from humans, poultry and environmental samples in urban and rural Bangladesh (2017). NERC Environmental Information Data Centre. https://doi.org/10.5285/dda6dd55-f955-4dd5-bc03-b07cc8548a3d

 

© Loughborough University

© International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh

Where/When

Study area
Temporal extent
2017-02-01    to    2018-10-31

Provenance & quality

Water (drinking, stream, waste and pond), soil and faecal samples were collected from farms and urban markets. Laboratory analysis of bacterial samples took place at International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research , Dhaka, Bangladesh. Laboratory results were recorded on paper-based forms or generated from automated readings, entered into Excel then converted to .csv files for ingestion into the Environmental Information Data Centre. Reference organisms and Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute (CLSI) guidelines were followed.

Correspondence/contact details

Dr Emily Rousham
Loughborough University
e.k.rousham@lboro.ac.uk

Authors

Rousham, E.K.
Loughborough University
Islam, M.A.
International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh
Unicomb, L.
International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh
Asaduzzaman, M.
International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh
Islam, R.
International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh
Amin, B.
International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh
Mozmader, T.I.M.A.
International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh
Hossain, M.I.
International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh
Rahman, M.
International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh

Other contacts

Custodian
Environmental Information Data Centre
eidc@ceh.ac.uk
Publisher
NERC Environmental Information Data Centre
eidc@ceh.ac.uk

Spatial

Spatial representation type
Tabular (text)
Spatial reference system
WGS 84

Tags

Topic categories
Health
Keywords
antibiotic susceptibility tests,  antimicrobial resistance,  bacterial counts,  carbapenem,  DNA,  Escherichia coli infectious disease,  microbiology,  third-generation cephalosporin