Greenwell, M.P. et al

Larval mass and survival data for Maniola jurtina under drought stress, UK

Larval mass and survival data for Meadow Brown butterflies (Maniola jurtina) originating from nine different source populations in the UK and reared under one of two host plant treatment groups (either control or drought stress) in an outdoor insectary at UKCEH under natural environmental conditions. Each individual larva was monitored at three growth check points throughout development: 49 days after hatching (pre-overwintering), 162 days after hatching (post overwintering during larval growth) and 309 days after hatching (late larval growth and pupation phase). Larval masses (mg) were recorded for all individuals that survived up to the second growth monitoring point and the number of larvae that survived until the third growth monitoring point were recorded.

Publication date: 2021-08-09

Get the data

This dataset is available under the terms of the Open Government Licence

Format of the data: Comma-separated values (CSV)

You must cite: Greenwell, M.P.; Botham, M.S.; Bruford, M.W.; Day, J.C.; Evans, L.C.; Gibbs, M.; Middlebrook, I.; Roy, D.B.; Watts, K.; Oliver, T.H. (2021). Larval mass and survival data for Maniola jurtina under drought stress, UK. NERC EDS Environmental Information Data Centre. https://doi.org/10.5285/f26f391f-a17b-4a0d-85c7-ab8af85c3f1b

 

Where/When

Study area

Provenance & quality

Newly hatched larvae were randomly selected and collected from laboratory stock populations that originated from nine different populations in UK. The larvae were placed (four per plant and all originating from the same laboratory source population) on potted host plants of Poa trivialis (either control or drought-stressed) and reared in netted cages in an outdoor insectary at UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (UKCEH) under natural environmental conditions. The outdoor insectary at UKCEH is an enclosed structure with a solid floor and roof, and 4 walls that are constructed such that they are half solid (bottom to mid-section), and half wire mesh (from mid-section to roof). The outdoor insectary provided the larval rearing cages with protection from rain and wind, but exposed them to the prevailing natural day/night temperatures, light and photoperiod. As a higher mortality was expected with drought stress, a total of 108 and 216 larvae were assigned to the control and drought stress treatment groups, respectively, and each laboratory source population contributed equivalent numbers of larvae to each treatment group.

Correspondence/contact details

Melanie Gibbs
UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology
Maclean Building, Benson Lane, Crowmarsh Gifford
Wallingford
Oxfordshire
OX10 8BB
UNITED KINGDOM
 enquiries@ceh.ac.uk

Authors

Greenwell, M.P.
University of Reading
Botham, M.S.
UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology
Bruford, M.W.
Cardiff University
Day, J.C.
UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology
Evans, L.C.
University of Reading
Gibbs, M.
UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology
Middlebrook, I.
Butterfly Conservation
Roy, D.B.
UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology
Oliver, T.H.
University of Reading

Other contacts

Custodian
NERC EDS Environmental Information Data Centre
 info@eidc.ac.uk
Publisher
NERC EDS Environmental Information Data Centre
 info@eidc.ac.uk
Rights Holder
UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology
 enquiries@ceh.ac.uk

Additional metadata

Topic categories
Biota
Keywords
butterflies,  drought tolerance,  host plant,  life history,  Maniola jurtina Meadow Brown
INSPIRE Theme
Environmental Monitoring Facilities
Spatial representation type
Tabular (text)
Spatial reference system
OSGB 1936 / British National Grid
Last updated
18 May 2022 12:21