Can Paying for Global Ecosystem Services reduce poverty? (P4GES)

This is a collection of data from experiments and surveys carried out in the Ankeniheny Zahamena Forest Corridor - the remains of the evergreen forest of eastern Madagascar.

The data comprise land use /cover classification, biomass estimates, forest inventory, site description, topographic information, site location, soil profile, above and below-ground carbon stocks, vegetation and indicator vegetation species and wood specific gravity.

It was produced by work package 4 of the P4GES (Can Paying for Global Ecosystem Services reduce poverty) project - a three year project (2013 - 2016) involving a consortium of eleven institutions in the UK, Madagascar, the USA, Switzerland and the Netherlands. The project focused on a single ecosystem (tropical forest) in a single low income country (Madagascar) to achieve a uniquely complete analysis in an effort to answer the central research question: "How can international ecosystem service payment schemes (specifically for carbon sequestration/storage and biodiversity conservation) most effectively reduce poverty in low income countries, given biophysical, economic and political realities"?

The project was funded by ESPA (Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation) - a research programme supported by DFID, NERC and ESRC and accredited by LWEC.

Supplemental information

Other useful information regarding this data collection:

The P4GES project aims to answer the question 'how can international ecosystem service payment schemes (specifically for carbon sequestration/storage and biodiversity conservation) most effectively reduce poverty in low income countries'.
ESPA is a global interdisciplinary research programme that aims to give decision-makers and natural resource users the evidence they need to address the challenges of sustainable ecosystem management and poverty reduction. The programme was developed by the UK government in response to the findings of the 2005 Millennium Ecosystem Assessment.